Homework: Is It Good for Kids? Here's What the Research Says | Time

 

research against homework

The Case Against Homework: The truth, according to Sara Bennett and Nancy Kalish, is that there is almost no evidence that homework helps elementary school students achieve academic success and little more that it helps older students. Aug 30,  · The most comprehensive research on homework to date comes from a meta-analysis by Duke University psychology professor Harris Cooper, who found evidence of a positive correlation between Author: Katie Reilly. Aug 29,  · E-homework is widening the gap for disadvantaged students. More and more teachers are turning to technology when assigning homework. But while e-homework can make out-of-class learning more fun and interactive, research suggests that it might further disadvantage.


Stanford research shows pitfalls of homework


Teachers should not abandon homework. Instead, they should improve its instructional research against homework. Throughout the first few decades of the 20th century, research against homework, educators commonly believed that homework helped create disciplined minds.

Bygrowing concern that homework interfered with other home activities sparked a reaction against it. This trend was reversed in the late s when the Soviets' launch of Sputnik led to concern that U. Bythe trend had reversed again, with some learning theorists claiming that homework could be detrimental to students' mental health. Since then, impassioned arguments for and against homework have continued to proliferate. We now stand at an interesting intersection in the evolution of the homework debate.

Arguments against homework are becoming louder and more popular, as evidenced by several recent books as well as an editorial in Time magazine Wallis, that presented these arguments as truth without much discussion of alternative perspectives. At the same time, a number of studies have provided growing evidence of the usefulness of homework when employed effectively. A number of synthesis studies have been conducted on homework, spanning a broad range of methodologies and levels of specificity see fig.

Some are quite general and mix the results from experimental studies research against homework correlational studies, research against homework. Synthesis Studies on Homework Synthesis Study. Note: This figure describes the eight major research syntheses on the research against homework of homework published from to that provide the basis for the analysis in this article.

The Cooper a study included more than empirical research reports, and the Cooper, Robinson, and Patall study included about 50 empirical research reports. The meta-analysis reviewed research dating as far back as the s; the research against homework reviewed research from to Commenting on studies that attempted to examine the causal relationship between homework and student achievement research against homework comparing experimental homework and control no homework groups, Cooper, Robinson, research against homework, and Patall noted, With only rare exceptions, the relationship between the amount of homework students do and their achievement outcomes was found to be positive and statistically significant.

Therefore, we think it would not be imprudent, research against homework, based on the evidence in hand, to conclude that doing homework causes improved academic achievement. Although the research support for homework is compelling, the case against homework is popular. The End of Homework: How Homework Disrupts Families, Overburdens Children, and Limits Learning by Kralovec and Buellconsidered by many to be the first high-profile attack on homework, asserted that homework contributes to a corporate-style, competitive U.

The authors focused particularly on the harm to economically disadvantaged students, who are unintentionally penalized because their environments often make it almost impossible to complete assignments at home. The authors called for people to unite against homework and to lobby for an extended school day instead. These authors criticized both the quantity and quality of homework. They provided research against homework that too much homework harms students' health and family time, and they asserted that teachers are not well trained in how to assign homework, research against homework.

The authors suggested that individuals and parent groups should insist that teachers reduce the amount of homework, design more valuable assignments, and avoid homework altogether over breaks and holidays.

In this book and in a recent article in Phi Delta Kappan bhe research against homework quite personal in his condemnation of researchers. For example, research against homework to Harris Cooper, the lead author of the two leading meta-analyses on homework, Kohn noted, A careful reading of Cooper's own studies. Finally, Kohn urged teachers to involve students in deciding what homework, research against homework, and how much, they should do.

Some of Kohn's recommendations have merit. For example, it makes good sense to only assign homework that is beneficial to student learning instead of assigning homework as a matter of policy. Many of those who conduct research on homework explicitly or implicitly recommend this practice. However, his misunderstanding or misrepresentation of the research sends the inaccurate message that research does not support homework.

As Figure 1 indicates, research against homework, homework has decades of research supporting its effective use. Kohn's allegations that researchers are trying to mislead practitioners and the general public are unfounded and detract from a useful debate on effective practice. Certainly, inappropriate homework may research against homework little or no benefit—it may even decrease student achievement.

All three of the books criticizing homework provide compelling anecdotes to this effect, research against homework. Schools should strengthen their policies to ensure that teachers use homework properly. If a district or school discards homework altogether, however, it will be throwing away a powerful instructional tool. Cooper and colleagues' comparison of homework with no homework indicates that the average student in a class in which appropriate homework was assigned would score 23 percentile points higher on tests of the knowledge addressed in that class than the average student in a class in which homework was not assigned, research against homework.

Perhaps the most important advantage of homework is that it can enhance achievement by extending learning beyond the school day. This characteristic is important because U. A report examined the amount of time U. To drop the use of homework, then, a school or district would be obliged to identify a practice that produces a similar effect within the research against homework of the school day without taking away or diminishing the benefits of other academic activities—no easy accomplishment.

A better approach is to ensure that teachers use homework effectively. To enact effective homework policies, however, schools and districts must address the following issues.

Although teachers across the K—12 spectrum commonly assign homework, research has produced no clear-cut consensus on the benefits of homework at the early elementary grade levels. In his early meta-analysis, Cooper a reported the following effect sizes p.

The pattern clearly indicates that homework has smaller effects at lower grade levels. Even so, Cooper b still recommended homework for elementary students because homework for young children should help them develop good study habits, foster positive attitudes toward school, and communicate to students the idea that learning takes work at home as well as at school.

The Cooper, Robinson, and Patall meta-analysis found the same pattern of stronger relationships at the secondary level but also identified a number of studies at grades 2, 3, and 4 demonstrating positive effects for homework, research against homework. In The Battle over HomeworkCooper noted that homework should have different purposes at different grade levels: For students in the earliest gradesit should foster positive attitudes, habits, and character traits; permit appropriate parent research against homework and reinforce learning of simple skills introduced in class.

For students in upper elementary gradesit should play a more direct role in fostering improved school achievement. In 6th grade and beyondit should play an important role in improving standardized test scores and grades. One of the more contentious issues in the homework debate is research against homework amount of time students should spend on homework. The Cooper synthesis a reported that for junior high school students, the benefits increased as time increased, up to 1 to 2 hours of homework a night, and then decreased.

The Cooper, Robinson, and Patall study reported similar findings: 7 to 12 hours of homework per week produced the largest effect size for 12th grade students.

The researchers suggested that for 12th graders the research against homework amount of homework might lie between 1. Still, researchers have offered various recommendations. For example, Good and Brophy cautioned that teachers must take care not to assign too much homework. They suggested that homework must be realistic in length and difficulty given the students' abilities to work independently. Thus, 5 to 10 minutes per subject might be appropriate for 4th graders, whereas 30 to 60 minutes might be appropriate for college-bound high school students.

Cooper, Robinson, and Patall also issued a strong warning about too much homework: Even for these oldest students, too much homework may diminish its effectiveness or even become counterproductive. He added that when required reading is included as a type of homework, the minute rule might be increased to 15 minutes.

Focusing on the amount of time students spend on homework, however, research against homework, may miss the point. A significant proportion of the research on homework indicates that the positive effects of homework relate to the amount of homework that the student completes rather than the amount of time spent on homework or the amount of homework actually assigned. Thus, simply assigning homework may not produce the desired effect—in fact, ill-structured homework might even have a negative effect on research against homework achievement.

Teachers must carefully plan and assign homework in a way that maximizes the potential for student success see Research-Based Homework Guidelines. Another question regarding homework is the extent to which schools should involve parents.

Some studies have reported minimal positive effects or even negative effects for parental involvement. They recommended interactive homework in which Parents receive clear guidelines spelling out their role. Teachers do not expect parents to act as experts regarding content or to attempt to teach the content.

Parents ask questions that help students clarify and summarize what they have learned. Such assignments cause students and their parents or other family members to become engaged in conversations that relate to the academic curriculum and thus extend the students' learning.

Although research has established the overall viability of homework as a tool to enhance student achievement, for the most part the research does not provide recommendations that are specific enough to help busy practitioners. This is the nature of research—it errs on the side of assuming that something does not work until substantial evidence establishes that it does, research against homework. The research community takes a long time to formulate firm conclusions on the basis of research.

Homework is a perfect example: Figure 1 includes synthesis studies that research against homework back as far as 60 years, yet all that research translates to a handful of recommendations articulated at a very general level.

In addition, research in a specific area, such as homework, research against homework, sometimes contradicts research in related areas. For example, Cooper recommended on the basis of plus years of homework research that teachers should not comment on or grade every homework assignment. Riehl pointed out the similarity between education research and medical research.

She commented, When reported in the popular media, medical research often appears as a blunt instrument, able to obliterate skeptics or opponents by the force of its evidence and arguments, research against homework. Yet repeated visits to the medical journals themselves can leave a much different impression. The serious medical journals convey the sense that medical research is an ongoing conversation and quest, punctuated occasionally by important findings that can and should alter practice, but more often characterized by continuing investigations.

These investigations, taken cumulatively, research against homework, can inform the work of practitioners who are building their own local knowledge bases on medical care. If relying solely on research is problematic, what are busy practitioners to do? Instead, educators should combine research-based generalizations, research from related areas, and their own professional judgment based on firsthand experience to develop specific practices and make adjustments as necessary.

Educators can develop the most effective practices by observing changes in the achievement of the students with whom they work every day. Research-Based Homework Guidelines Research provides strong evidence that, when used appropriately, homework benefits student achievement. To make sure that homework is appropriate, teachers should follow these guidelines: Assign purposeful homework.

Legitimate purposes for homework include introducing new content, practicing a skill or process that students can do independently but not fluently, elaborating on information that has been research against homework in research against homework to deepen students' knowledge, and providing opportunities for students to explore topics of their own interest. Design homework to maximize the chances that students will complete it.

For example, ensure that homework is at the appropriate level of difficulty. Students should be able to complete homework assignments independently with relatively high success rates, but they should still find the assignments challenging enough to be interesting. Involve parents in appropriate ways for example, as a sounding board to help students summarize what they learned from the homework without requiring parents to act as teachers or to police students' homework completion.

Carefully monitor the amount of homework assigned so that it is appropriate to students' age levels and does not take too much time away from other home activities. Balli, S, research against homework. When mom and dad help: Student reflections on parent involvement with homework. Journal of Research and Development in Education, 31 3research against homework, — Bangert-Drowns, R.

 

The Case Against Homework

 

research against homework

 

Mar 10,  · Stanford research shows pitfalls of homework. The researchers asked students whether they experienced health issues such as headaches, exhaustion, sleep deprivation, weight loss and stomach problems. • Less time for friends, family and extracurricular pursuits: Both the survey data and student responses indicate that spending too much time on. Mar 05,  · March 5, pm (UTC) “There is no evidence that any amount of homework improves the academic performance of elementary students.”. This statement, by homework research guru Harris Cooper, of Duke University, is startling to hear, no matter which side of the homework debate you’re hbpdfs.gq: Heather Shumaker. The Case Against Homework: The truth, according to Sara Bennett and Nancy Kalish, is that there is almost no evidence that homework helps elementary school students achieve academic success and little more that it helps older students.